Tiny Handmade Doll Quilt

I brought this tiny quilt back with me from my trip to Kentucky. It was a doll quilt that my grandmother made for me when I was a little girl. You can see it’s pretty small!

Handmade Doll Quilt

My grandmother typically hand pieced and hand quilted her quilts, but you can tell this one was built more with quickness of completion and durability in mind. It is made completely by machine except for the binding, which is hand sewn to the back of the quilt.

Not too hard to guess that I was a little girl in the 1970’s, is it?? The colors of these fabrics are a dead giveaway!

Another Diamonds Squared Quilt

I’m almost afraid to post the truth about this quilt. I’m afraid you will all get mad and yell at me, though it’s not my fault. But here goes.

Another Diamonds Squared

This quilt has spent decades living in the garage and the trunk of my parents’ car <dodges rotten tomatoes>. It’s a crazy thing to have so many handmade quilts lying around that they weren’t thought of as something special. The least among them was relegated to emergency use on car trips or for picnics or whatever.

Another Diamonds Squared

It’s hand quilted in a little zig-zag pattern. And I thought you might like close-ups of the fabrics.

Another Diamonds Squared

Another Diamonds Squared

Another Diamonds Squared

Another Diamonds Squared

Another Diamonds Squared

Another Diamonds Squared

Another Diamonds Squared

And did I mention the back of this quilt yet??

Another Diamonds Squared

Or the awesome pieced binding?

Another Diamonds Squared

Another Diamonds Squared

Just for comparison, here are the other quilts in this pattern that I’ve already shown you. I really need better pictures of some of these!

Diamonds Squared

Great Grandma's Quilt -- Diamonds Squared

Diamonds Squared with Pieced Border
Diamonds Squared with Pieced Border

Someone clearly liked this pattern!

And would you believe that I found a photo from a Girl Scout camping trip that shows a quilt with this pattern in the tent, but that it’s clearly not any of these three, but YET ANOTHER ONE?? I haven’t been able to dig that one up, but surely it’s around here somewhere….

My Baby Blanket

I just realized that I’m not 100% sure who made this. I’m guessing my mother’s mother (Verna Weber). I’ll have to find that out!

My Baby Blanket

Anyhow, this sad, falling-apart bit of a quilt was my baby blanket. It was VERY well loved. I carried it all over the house with me for years and years. Long after I wasn’t a baby any longer.

My Baby Blanket

It’s a solid piece of fabric on the front, with little sheep on it, and another solid piece of fabric on the back. But it’s fancied up with the little scalloped edges.

My Baby Blanket

The back looks even worse than the front, but it’s easier to see some of the pattern in the hand quilting if you look at the back.

My Baby Blanket

I can say for sure that this quilt looked just like this when it was put away in storage some 30-odd years ago. I really have no idea how I could have worn it out this badly just carrying it around the house, but I’m guessing it was washed in the washing machine a fair amount as well. I do still have a fondness for this little blanket.

Childhood Quilt

It wouldn’t be a trip back to Kentucky if I didn’t uncover another handmade quilt or two or three or four, lying around my parents’ house!

This is another of those quilts that came in a pair — one each for my sister and I. They were handmade in the mid-1970’s or so by my mother’s mother (Verna Weber). I love how she clearly quilted in the way that she preferred, without worrying about what anyone else might think.

Handmade Kid's Quilt

The front of this quilt is mostly hand pieced, but the big long sashing strips on the edges are sewn on by machine. I’m with ya, Grandma. I wouldn’t have wanted to sew those boring old strips on by hand either (I barely have the patience to do sashing by machine as it is!).

Handmade Kid's Quilt

And the back is fun with the little strips of gingham along the edges. I’m guessing that’s a full width of fabric for the solid and she just made up the difference with leftovers from the front. Very cute!

Handmade Kid's Quilt

I left my feet in for scale so you could see that these are bigger than a little baby blanket. More like a kid-sized throw.

I brought this cute quilt home with me. Oh – and I also brought back this quilt that my father made, an Amish woman quilted, and I bound. Apparently, it was for me!! Good thing I managed to give away all those quickie IKEA quilts I made (two to some local friends with kids, one to my sister, one to some friends who are moving away, and one shipping shortly to a high school friend is adopting a second child soon)!!

Seeking Advice on a Damaged Quilt

Hi everyone! I’m back from my travels, and an adventure they were.

Me & my sister Annie, circa 1975, under one of these quilts.

I spent the night on the way there in Chicago, compliments of United Airlines. I was not able to collect my checked bag, so I had to beg a toothbrush and toothpaste off the bellman at the O’Hare Hilton and wear ALL the same clothes for two days. At least I got a bed and a shower. No complaints about that!

I opted to be re-routed to Lexington from Louisville so I wouldn’t have to wait 24 hours for a flight out (through Cleveland!), but my bag went to Louisville. They sent it by courier to my parents’ house, where it arrived at 10:15 that night. Two very long days!!

On the way back, the 12-year old boy traveling alone and sitting directly behind me threw up during the landing. Everyone felt really bad for him. It *was* pretty bumpy and it was a small plane.

But I had fun visiting with some old friends and my parents were very happy to have me around for a week. Well, almost a week – my mother was really disappointed when I had to spend the first night in Chicago!

Anyhow, while I was there we dug out a few things, as usual. My mother wanted to know what I thought of the quilts my sister and I had on our beds when we were kids. I’ve shown one of them to you before.

They have sustained some significant damage. I honestly don’t know if they can be saved, so I’m posting the horrifying photos here to see if anyone out there has any suggestions. If you want to see them in more detail, click on the photos and you will be taken to Flickr where you can view larger versions.

This one has the most damage to the fabrics. Large portions of the white areas on the front are just gone, and some of the patterned squares are missing as well.

Quilt handmade by my grandmother in the 1970s

These shots show some areas closer up.

Fabric damage to front of quilt.

Fabric damage to front of quilt.

The other major problem on this quilt is that it has some serious mold. My parents basement has always had a water problem, and this quilt apparently got wet during the last catastrophe and then was not adequately dried out before it was stored.

Mold damage to front of quilt

There are spots of mold on the back as well.

Mold Damage to back of quilt

The other quilt does not have the mold damage, or as much damage to the fabrics (for some unknown reason), but is just overall a lot grungier looking. The quilt in the photos above is at the top of the photo below. See how the quilt at the bottom of the photo looks brown in comparison??

Matching quilts made by my grandmother in the 1970's.

So, the questions are, is the fabric damage repairable/reconstructable, can the mold be removed, can the grungy one be gotten clean again, and would you clean first and then repair (to get a better match of the fabrics) or repair and then clean (so the whole thing doesn’t fall apart when you clean it?)???

All recommendations welcome!

This photo shows me and my sister, circa 1975, sitting together in one of our beds (I can’t remember whose this was), under one of these quilts. (I’m on the right.)

Me & my sister Annie, circa 1975, under one of these quilts.

Have a great weekend everyone!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...