The Liberty Book of Home Sewing

I recently received a copy of the new Liberty Book of Home Sewing from the publisher (I am super psyched that I have somehow gotten on their “media” list to qualify for the occasional review copy!). I did get the book for free, but no one is paying me to do a review of it. I just am, because it is such lovely eye candy!

The Liberty Book of Home Sewing

The first thing I noticed about this book, and ooh’ed and aah’ed over, was all the fabulous, gratuitous images of the most gorgeous Liberty fabrics.

The Liberty Book of Home Sewing

Even if you don’t look at the projects, just seeing all these prints nearly makes this book worth owning.

The Liberty Book of Home Sewing

But eye candy aside, this book is quite lovely. I was immediately struck but how much it reminded me of the vintage sewing book I picked up on my birthday weekend. Both books include information about all different kinds of sewing projects and sewing techniques, and they are presented in a similar fashion.

The Liberty Book of Home Sewing

The Liberty book does not have a lot of step-by-step photos for projects. Projects are primarily illustrated with drawings, and the instructions may assume that you know basic sewing techniques (as any woman in the 50’s or 60’s would have). The instructions are presented in little paragraphs, rather than numbered steps, much like my vintage book. It’s really a lovely retro feel to the entire thing, but if you are used to the more modern type of layout for sewing books and/or have trouble following directions, you may find this a little hard to use.

The Liberty Book of Home Sewing

I really love that they have additional bits for many of the projects called “Taking it farther” that suggest ways to take the project to the next level. But do note that these little sections do not always have detailed instructions. They are sometimes more like ideas for you to sort out yourself.

The Liberty Book of Home Sewing

I love the traditional feel of many of these projects. The Cook’s Apron for example. You may think it’s just another apron pattern, but they’ve managed to make it cute while keeping some quality touches, like adjustable d-rings for the neck tie and hand wiper that attaches with snaps (so brilliant!!). This pattern includes a child’s version and the option to do a pocket instead of a hand wiper. (I have to say that I have never used a pocket on a kitchen apron, but I am totally in love with the idea of a removable hand wiper — maybe several to swap out??)

The Liberty Book of Home Sewing

The Liberty Book of Home Sewing

Other projects range from basic but sometimes hard to find instructions on these days, like the instructions for a box cushion of any size or a Roman shade, to others that are more extravagant, like the Rose Pillow (this looks REALLY luxuriant with the velvet and the three-dimensional fabric roses) and the Peacock Pincushion that may be as a showy as a real peacock.

The Liberty Book of Home Sewing

The Liberty Book of Home Sewing

One thing to note is that this book does not contain pattern pieces. It also doesn’t contain images that need to be enlarged. Instead, when pieces are required, it has drawings and instructions that tell you how to make your own pattern pieces. Just another feature with a very vintage feel.

The Liberty Book of Home Sewing

This book includes projects that use a variety of different fabric types (all Liberty of course), from their Tana Lawn to Balcombe Silk to Cotton Canvas to Rossmore Cord. Everything but Tana Lawn might be hard for those of us in the US to come by (and even that at a VERY pretty penny), but it’s still beautiful to see. And just to make it easy on us, they have included a Glossary of Fabrics in the back that is its own little bit of eye candy.

The Liberty Book of Home Sewing

Projects in this book

Essentials:
Basic Pillows
Simple Drapes
Eco shopping bag
Cook’s Apron
Sugar-Bag Doorstop
Toiletry Bag
Roman Shade
Beanbag
Tote Bag

Organization:
Keepsake Board
Jewelry Roll
Drawstring Bag
Gadget Case
Peacock Pincushion
Book Covers

Accents:
Round Pillow
Rose Corsage
Rose Pillow
Bench Cushion
Frilly Apron
Kimono
Lampshade
Rose Throw
Traditional Crib Quilt
Contemporary Brick Quilt

I personally am excited to find some time to try out a couple of these projects. If only I had some Liberty fabrics that I could use to make them!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

1 comment to The Liberty Book of Home Sewing

  • This looks like a fabulous book, so I’m glad you shared it with us! I didn’t know they had a book. I’ve never sewn with any Liberty fabrics, but have always wanted to so this is good motivation. Looks like the book is full of great ideas and inspiration.

Leave a Reply

 

 

 

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>